Successful tests for U.S. Coast Guard type approval with zero holding time

Alfa Laval has successfully completed additional tests at the Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) to verify the biological efficacy of Alfa Laval PureBallast 3 without holding time.

Alfa Laval has successfully completed additional tests at the Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) to verify the biological efficacy of Alfa Laval PureBallast 3 without holding time. As a result, PureBallast 3 is on target to be the first UV ballast water treatment system with zero holding time in its U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) type approval for all three water salinities. The test reporting is in its final stages.

NIVA’s ballast team was the first of all international ballast test facilities to run a new testing protocol, established in collaboration with DNV-GL and approved by USCG, for verifying BWMS manufacturer new claim of 0h retention time. As a result, Alfa Laval, being one of the major actors on the ballast market, will probably be the first one to get its BWMS approved by USCG with 0h retention time, says Stephanie Delacroix, Ballast-test Facility Manager at NIVA.

Global treaty to halt invasive aquatic species enters into force

 The International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments (BWM Convention) requires ships to manage their ballast water to remove, render harmless or avoid the uptake or discharge of aquatic organisms and pathogens within ballast water and sediments. The convention enetered into force September 8th 2017.

“This is a landmark step towards halting the spread of invasive aquatic species, which can cause havoc for local ecosytems, affect biodiversity and lead to substantial economic loss”, said IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim in a press release.

“The requirements which enter into force today [September 8th] mean that we are now addressing what has been recognized as one of the greatest threats to the ecological and the economic well-being of the planet. Invasive species are causing enormous damage to biodiversity and the valuable natural riches of the earth upon which we depend. Invasive species also cause direct and indirect health effects and the damage to the environment is often irreversible”, he said.

Lim added that the entry into force of the BWM Convention will not only minimize the risk of invasion by alien species via ballast water, it will also provide a level playing field globally for international shipping, providing clear and robust standards for the management of ballast water on ships.

Read more: NIVA approved by US Coast Guard as subcontracted test facility for Lloyd’s Register

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NIVA’s Marine Research Station in the narrow Drøbak Sound became the first internationally authorized full scale testing facility for both marine and brackish water back in 2005 (Photo: NIVA).

NIVA approved by US Coast Guard as subcontracted test facility for Lloyd’s Register

Since 26th of January 2017, NIVA can provide US Coast Guard testing to the English Class Society Lloyd’s Register as approved subcontracted test facility, in addition to the Norwegian Class Society DNV-GL.

Lloyd’s Register (LR) is a global engineering, technical and business services organization wholly owned by the Lloyd’s Register Foundation. In November 2016, Lloyd’s Register filed an application package requesting that the Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) could conduct tests on their behalf. January 26th, US Coast Guard confirmed that this request had been accepted.

The Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), located in Norway, is now included as a subcontracted facility to conduct tests on Lloyd’s Register’s behalf in accordance with 46 CFR 162.060-26 (Land based testing) and 46 CFR 162.060-28 (Shipboard testing).

This adds to the great progress NIVA’s ballast water team has experienced since NIVA’s Marine Research Station at Solbergstrandbecame the first internationally authorized full scale testing facility for both marine water and brackish water back in 2005. In march 2015, NIVA’s ballast water test facility was the second one in Europe to be approved by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) to run USCG testing on behalf of USCG in cooperation with DNV-GL. On December 2nd 2016, the Coast Guard Marine Safety Center issued the very first U.S. Coast Guard Ballast Water Management System (BWMS) Type Approval Certificate to the Norwegian manufacturer Optimarin AS after both land-based and shipboard testing carried out by NIVA.

– This adds to the formidable testing experiences gained since the start in 2005, and the great R&D effort of NIVA’s Test Facility for sampling, analysis methods and other required testing procedures, says August Tobiesen, research scientist at NIVA.

– This will increase significantly the number of ballast project at Solbergstrand and will require stronger ballast team to cope with this and the new IMO challenging regulation requirements as well, says Stephanie Delacroix, project manager and research scientist at NIVA.

Even more challenging test requirements from the USA are expected soon, and NIVA is preparing for a larger portfolio.

– To cope with the coming increase in projects, we are building up the feed water storage tank from 500 to 800m3, says Oddbjørn Pettersen, test site manager at NIVA.

– The new test facility should be ready for the new testing season start in April 2017 and the whole Solbergstrand team is working very hard on it right now.

>> Read more: NIVA meets American requirements for ballast water management methods

NIVA’s collaborator Optimarin first BWT system supplier to obtain USCG approval

On December 2nd 2016, the Coast Guard Marine Safety Center issued the first U.S. Coast Guard Ballast Water Management System (BWMS) Type Approval Certificate to Norwegian manufacturer Optimarin AS after a detailed review of the type approval application determined the system met the requirements. The system has been tested in close cooperation with NIVA.

The development, which adds to IMO approval and certification from a host of classification societies, means Optimarin’s environmentally friendly UV-based technology now leads the market in terms of global compliance.

– This is a huge day for our company, and our customers, says Optimarin CEO Tore Andersen.

– US Coast Guard has the world’s most stringent testing standards, meaning that once a system has approval it is assured of total global compliance, now and into the future.

In early 2015, the Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) was officially approved by US Coast Guard (USCG) as subcontracted testing facility for BWMS. NIVA quickly started official USCG testing of this BWMS developed by Optimarin in freshwater, brackishwater and seawater qualities for land-based and shipboard testing. That acceptance by US Coast Guard came at the 10 year anniversary of the Test Facility at Solbergstrand. Less than two years later, the USCG-approval for Optimarin marks another milestone for NIVA’s ballast water team.

– We are proud to have been the test facility for the first BWT system supplier to obtain USCG approval, says Stephanie Delacroix, project manager and research scientist at NIVA.

– This adds to the formidable testing experiences gained since the start in 2005, and the great R&D effort of NIVA’s Test Facility for sampling, analysis methods and other required testing procedures, Delacroix says.

Read the full article at niva.no – NIVA’s collaborator Optimarin first BWT system supplier to obtain USCG approval.

Alfa Laval reapplies for USCG approval using ‘stain’ test

Alfa Laval became the first ballast water management system (BWMS) supplier to reapply for US Coast Guard (USCG) type-approval September 21st after its first application was rejected in December. That failure was, according to a statement to Ballast Water treatment technology, because the USCG said the testing regime that it and others had used was not acceptable, so Alfa Laval commissioned new tests on its PureBallast 3 family using the CMFDA/FDA ‘stain’ test protocol.

Alfa Laval carried out their own research tests at DHI in Denmark and BallastTech-NIVA in Norway with official testing being commissioned from DHI with class DNV GL preparing a test report package. The class society is accredited as an independent laboratory by the USCG for this role.

In a statement, Anders Lindmark, general manager, said the testing involved the same hardware, power consumption and flow as the IMO-approved version of PureBallast 3.

>> Read more at www.ballastwatermanagement.co.uk

IMO ballast water convention to come into force in 2017

Finland’s ratification means the convention will come into force on 8 September 2017, which is now set to be a key date for shipowners, managers and equipment manufacturers around the world.
Finland’s accession brings the combined tonnage of contracting states to the treaty to 35.1441 percent, with 52 contracting parties. The convention stipulates that it will enter into force 12 months after ratification by a minimum of 30 States, representing 35 percent of world merchant shipping tonnage.

Read more: NIVA officially approved by USCG as subcontracted testing facility for BWMS

Norway is a major shipping nation and Norwegian shipowners own and operates a large part of the world fleet through shipping companies registered in other countries. The Norwegian offshore fleet and rig fleet is among the largest in the world. Thus it is natural that Norwegian actors are central in the development of technology for ballast water.

NIVA’s Marine Research Station at Solbergstrand in the narrow Drøbak Sound, a little south of Oslo, became the first internationally authorised full scale testing facility for both marine water and brackish water in 2005.

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Seawater is mixed with marine organisms in large tanks in the test facilities at Solbergstrand in Drøbak Sound before the water is pumped through the treatment equipment undergoing tests. To be certified, equipment has to kill test organisms efficiently without releasing toxic compounds into aquatic environments. (Photo: NIVA)

Read more: How NIVA deals with ballast water